Epilogue
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his History of the Battle of Hastings has taken two years to produce. Only now do I feel in a position to write this epilogue. I would like to say that it is finally complete. If you have read this story, you must now realise that I can never say that the final page has been written. There will always be questions that will possibly remain unanswered due to lack of sufficient evidence. It is very easy to speculate, and in some respects, that is all we can do. History is such a difficult subject. Sometimes the only way to the truth is to read as many different accounts as you can, and like water, allow them all to find their own level. This way you moderate the outrageous and enhance the understated. I hope I have achieved this to your satisfaction. 

hen I finally sat down to write this account, It was still unclear in my mind as to whom it was intended. I had no pre-conceived ideas of it being an academic document or a school or college resource. In fact, I would go so far as to say that it was initially written as a challenge to myself to discover the truth about the medieval history that surrounded me. Sometimes it can be a very lonely and frustrating experience, but at other times very rewarding. There have been periods where I have questioned my own motives and time spent on this project. I have even felt like giving up on a number of occasions. Now that it is in the final stages of production and available for you to read and comment on, I am encouraged by your responses when you write to me. Your feedback has made it all worthwhile. Without your comments, It would not have developed the way it has. By submitting this account of the Battle of Hastings 1066 to the web, I have allowed my work to be viewed by readers who would not normally be interested in such a subject. If these people find my account worthy of their time I will be delighted. Of course, there are those who are experts in their fields who wish to emphasise their superior knowledge on a particular facet or period. That is fine. I am always prepared to bow to "superior knowledge". Some of these letters have been re-produced in the main text. I am quite happy to be criticised or aided with any valid fact, argument or speculation that could possibly hold water. I have written for the widest possible audience and included as much graphical detail as my web space provider allows. This story covers a thousand years of history. I wish I were an expert on the whole of this period. The fact is - either I or anybody else can be. The subject is just too vast and the times too nebulous. I try to answer people's questions whenever I can on a one to one basis. I am quite prepared to stand my ground if I think I am right and they are wrong. Unfortunately, I receive too many letters to permit me to always answer as fully as I would like. I have tried, but the letters were taking more time than the account. If you have written to me and not received an acknowledgement or reply, it's not because I have ignored your letter, but more because you have asked a question that requires a fuller explanation or I simply don't know the answer at this stage. I have written this account with the web in mind. personally I find it all very dis-jointed. It is all too easy to end up where you don't want to be. To avoid making this mistake I set out with a blank sheet of paper and deliberately ignored other internet sites on this subject. The end result has turned out a lot more personal than expected. I have not included sources in the main text as it detracts from the account. They can be found in the "Further Information section".

s stated in the introduction, emotion and obsession could get the better of you when writing such things. I never thought I would be affected this way, but I must admit to my feelings sometimes getting the better of me during the production. I live on Caldbec Hill where Harold and his men camped before that fateful day. On the top of the hill is a park bench. I defy anybody who is aware of the location and its significance to sit there and not have thoughts pertaining to the events of 1066. To have history below one's feet is indeed a thought provoking experience to anybody who has interest in his or her surroundings. I know when you write to me that you often comment about this. Indeed, it is true; it does help me when trying to convey the atmosphere of the location and story to you . To write about a battle such as Hastings in isolation is possibly acceptable for those who are conversant with English History. For foreign readers however, some of the events and actions would appear strange to them. For this very reason, I have spent some time building up to the battle in 1066 with copious prehistory from 55 BC. This way, I hope the culmination extends a feeling of inevitability.

his is a one-man attempt to create something that satisfies both my own curiosity and I hope yours. We are an island race, and not to put a too finer point on it, violently nationalistic. You must excuse me if at times I lapse in any form of patriotic fervour, which of course is totally unacceptable. I am proud of my country and its heritage. I am proud of our insistence on freedom and self-determination and antagonism to oppression. On a number of occasions in history, Britain has been on its knees and close to disaster. Even today, it has not gone unnoticed that Britain is a bit of an enigma as far as Europe is concerned. You cannot explain this in words but the old island mentality and that thin strip of water known as the English Channel has isolated and set us apart from the mainland. It almost seems to be part of the job description when you are born to protect it by any means available. This attitude is hundreds of years old. The arch Eurosceptic was Godwin, Harold II's father who especially disliked the French. Even today, many would say that that antagonism still exists against Europe. If this is so, it is because it has developed over many years. It is only our resourcefulness that has stopped us being defeated on numerous occasions. We are what we are by necessity not design.

here have been some questionable incidents in this countries history that we should never repeat. There are others - by the same tokens that are a great inspiration to us. One such incident was the Battle of Hastings that was fought on the 14th October 1066. This was a defeat for this country. It proves that inspiration does not always come from victory. I will continue to write on this subject whilst I can maintain the standards I have set myself and that the information included is of some merit. If you have read my interpretation and enjoyed it, please return in the future and give me your further opinion. 

he comments made here are of a personal nature. I am sure you all have national pride. I don't wish to sound elitist or arrogant. I probably just feel the same about my country as you do about yours. 
 
 

The King is Dead - Long Live the King


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copyright Glen Ray Crack - Battle - East Sussex - United Kingdom
Submitted 10th January 1998
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